What’s for Dinner?



What’s for dinner?

It’s a common question in some households. 

And often the answer is a refrain of “I don’t know. What do you want?”

It can be hard to come to a decision, because every family member may have a different opinion. 

Some will feel strongly about their choice. “I definitely want pasta.” 

Others will vehemently oppose their choice. “No way. Definitely not pasta. I’m not eating pasta. I want a big juicy hamburger.” 

A third family member will chime in. “Hamburger?! Are you crazy?! Do you know how bad red meat is for your health?! We need to have a veggie dish.” 

And round and round the exchange will go. 

The person in charge of dinner may suggest a fourth option, something that satisfies everyone. 

But, alas there’s no option that will satisfy everyone. 

The decision maker might try to table the discussion until a later date. The only problem is that everyone needs to have dinner. You can’t wait all night to decide what’s for dinner. Otherwise, you push off the inevitable and end up with a breakfast decision. 

It’s a true mess until someone makes a decision. The more dinner options that are presented, the more difficult the decision becomes. 

In this type of predicament, you might see true leadership take hold. The person in charge of dinner may step forward and say, “I’ll decide. Everyone’s health is of the utmost importance, so we will go with a veggie dish.”

Or you may more likely see a complete leadership void. The person in charge says, “I’m not really sure what decision I should make and I don’t want anyone to be put off by my decision. I’ll just make four meals and everyone can choose a specific option or I’ll just leave it up to everyone else to decide.”

Two hours later, after all of the different meals have been prepared, there will still be complaints about the options. 

And no one will be satisfied with the outcome. Just more disillusioned with the person in charge, especially if that person is elected to make the hard decisions. 

#ThanksGov

 

Rich